November 16, 2012

"Nut up or shut up"

"Someday very soon, life's little Twinkie gauge is gonna go ... empty."

Prophetic.

Is it too late to get Twinkies added to the endangered species list? Where's the EPA when we really NEED it!

Posted by JohnGalt at 11:29 AM | Comments (5)
But jk thinks:

Mondo heh!

However, this being ThreeSources, I am going to warn good people not to allow non-union animus to cloud their economic thinking.

Greedy Bakers (Lochner v New York anybody?) may have hastened the demise of the yellow alleged food. But -- as Governor Romney tried to explain -- plants and brands of value will survive bankruptcy. If somebody wants to invest in Chrysler or Hostess, they can; else the assets will be put to greater use.

And if they are not wanted, it is the loud voice of the free market saying "we are wealthier now and have access to better tasting snacks."

Posted by: jk at November 16, 2012 12:23 PM
But Keith Arnold thinks:

New hashtag trending on Twitter, to the certain delight of readers and authors here:

#HostessShrugged

Posted by: Keith Arnold at November 16, 2012 12:57 PM
But johngalt thinks:

Cloud? The movie clip tie-in is two-fold: First as evidence that the Zombie Apocalypse is surely nigh. Second, not to lament the demise of the Twinkie, but to celebrate the fungibility of capital, recipes and trademark rights. I fully expect, in due time, the Twinkie to be reborn. Perhaps even with the original brand name but under new ownership and not a whiff of union labor.

Posted by: johngalt at November 16, 2012 1:50 PM
But jk thinks:

Apologies if I misconstrued. We're into that C-word "Conservatism" again. I see some, if not y'all, waxing poetic about a snack of their youth at the expense of realizing that demand might be a bigger issue than bakers' benefits.


Posted by: jk at November 17, 2012 11:03 AM
But johngalt thinks:

Waning demand may have soon sent Twinkies the way of buggy whips but free men willingly risked their capital on the bet that it would not. By refusing to make bakers' pension payments no longer the most expensive ingredient, the labor union's "consistently poor management" has decided the bet before it was placed.

And why does the union refuse to accomodate? Because doing so is an admission that everything free-market advocates have been saying is sustainably true - and everything the redistributionists say only works for as long as the faith holds out. In the case of Hostess the music has stopped and it's time to scramble for a seat. I look forward to seeing how the public reacts when the workers are left standing, despite the "protection" offered by their unionization.

Posted by: johngalt at November 17, 2012 2:44 PM

October 20, 2012

Soi Disant -- or is that soy disant -- free people

We sure allow ourselves to be bullied by the Feds on food. Baylen J. Linnekin, Executive Director of Keep Food Legal, takes to Reason to list Ten Federal Food-Policy Issues Obama and Romney Should Discuss.

All ten are deeply depressing reminders of what we've given away. The Federal government performs paramilitary raids on raw milk, approves brand logos and packaging, gives (traditionally very bad) advice on nutrition, &c.

Trade all ten for the Tenth Amendment, good people.

Posted by John Kranz at 11:24 AM | Comments (1)
But johngalt thinks:
"I've worked hard for every lump of coal I've taken out of the ground. And what do I have to show for it? I can't set my prices. I can't choose to whom I sell my product. The government takes what it wants, and taxes what it leaves behind!"

-Ken Dannager, Dannager Coal, Atlas Shrugged Part 2 (the movie)

It hasn't been as sudden or as obvious as 'Directive 10-289' but we are most of the way there, nonetheless.

Posted by: johngalt at October 22, 2012 2:45 PM

December 4, 2011

Colorado Native Lager

Last spring I made my first attempt at growing hops. The plants never sprouted and I was quite disappointed, but others had better luck than I and the 100% Colorado brew from Coors brewing has been completed.

As soon as today, a batch of Colorado Native made with homegrown hops will hit store shelves, thanks to the efforts of 130 volunteer growers.

A year ago, AC Golden Brewing put out an invitation to its Facebook fans to accept a free hops rhizome, plant it and donate the harvested crop to the brewer.

The intent was to get AC Golden closer to its goal of producing a beer with all-Colorado ingredients. It's 99.89 percent local with Colorado barley, water and yeast. The missing fraction is hops the flowery green herb that gives beer its sublime bitterness.

The yield was not enough to produce a year's worth of the brew, but it's a start. As for the product? I posted the following on the beer's Facebook page:

My two rhizomes never broke ground - perhaps they languished in the fridge too long before I planted them. I'll try again in the spring. But I picked up a 12-pack yesterday and ... love it! I love highly hopped beers but the first bottle I drank (from a glass) almost blew me away. I got a headache it was so hoppy! (Had just returned from a day near Blackhawk though so was perhaps O2 deprived.) Second bottle today was more mellow but very tasty, well balanced and on its way to being the only beer I drink for as long as I can get it. Lovely red-amber. Five stars!

Back in the day, Coors Banquet Beer, brewed only in Colorado, was not available east of the Mississipi River (a fact capitalized on in the storyline for the movie "Smokey and the Bandit.) Coors is now also bottled in Virginia and available nationwide. CO Native, however - only in Colorado, brothers and sisters.

Posted by JohnGalt at 8:49 PM | Comments (2)
But Terri thinks:

Excellent!

Posted by: Terri at December 5, 2011 11:40 AM
But jk thinks:

I remember sneaking Coors was a big deal when I was a lad. Visiting easterners would load a couple of cases in their car. My folks shipped a case to a relative in Alabama. When Reverend <name changed to protect the guilty> showed up to pick up his "canned goods" shipped from Denver, the wrapping was torn. The Huntsville postal workers delivered the contraband amid much jocularity.

I will try the native, though I had some of the New Belgium seasonal Snow Day and I am under its spell.

Posted by: jk at December 5, 2011 11:57 AM

September 17, 2011

O zapft ist!

Or translated literally, "O" taps is!

Oktoberfest 2011: September 17th until October 3rd

It is tapped!

Posted by JohnGalt at 11:51 AM | Comments (1)
But jk thinks:

This calls for a song!
Du, du liegst mir im Herzen
du, du liegst mir im Sinn.
Du, du machst mir viel Schmerzen,
weißt nicht wie gut ich dir bin.
Ja, ja, ja, ja, weißt nicht wie gut ich dir bin.

Posted by: jk at September 18, 2011 12:36 PM

September 24, 2008

Que Sera Sera

A little-known Chilean wine known as Palin Syrah has apparently lost favor in the City by the Bay. Sales in San Francisco of this boutique product have fallen faster than a thermometer on the North Slope in January. Texas, however, seems to be picking up the slack.

The Refugee will confess to being a bit of a wine snob and may have to see about picking up a bottle at the local Daveco Liquors. He may need to find out how it pairs with a certain $8 cheese.

Posted by Boulder Refugee at 1:11 PM | Comments (2)
But jk thinks:

Mon Dieu!

Posted by: jk at September 24, 2008 1:30 PM
But AlexC thinks:

Thermostats on the northslope in January are pretty much bottomed out!

But the larger point.... A pair of my very best North Slope co-workers were visting our nation's capitol, and when carded at a bar, they were "accosted" by crazy Lib-tards for daring to bare an Alaska driver license.

wtf?

Posted by: AlexC at September 24, 2008 2:42 PM